GEI Administration Control Panel


 
August 2014
 
The upcoming feature will highlight the company’s role in new efficient energy technology.

Boca Raton FL, August 12, 2014 — With the growing focus on fuel cells as a primary energy source for the future, GEI Global Energy Corp. will be the subject of special coverage on 21st Century Television, airing on Bloomberg Worldwide (as pd. prog.) and Fox Business Network (as pd. prog).

The CEO of GEI, Dr. K.J. Berry, commented, “We are pleased and proud that the energy market, and the financial markets in general, are taking note of our major advances in the fuel cell and energy market. This exposure will allow the public to see the encouraging contribution GEI is making to an energy-secure future.”

GEI GLOBAL ENERGY CORP was originally founded in 2007 as a spin-off of a private company focused on fuel cell technologies. The company is publicly traded on the OTC markets and other trading platforms.

The Fuel Cell and Sustainable/Alternative Energy industry is increasingly seen as a major part of the world’s energy future. Fuel cells provide a number of advantages over traditional sources of energy and are both highly efficient and environmentally sensitive.

Dr. Berry added his perspective in saying, “We’re excited that GEI is a source of encouraging news on the vital issues affecting our energy future.”

Vice President of Programming for 21st Century Television JL Haber agreed with Dr. Berry in commenting, “Our viewers turn to us to keep track of the innovative solutions provided by such companies as GEI Global Energy Copr. We’re excited to play a role in bringing news of this company’s advances to the general public.”

 

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Global Energy Innovations' (GEI) Fuel Cell Auxillary Power Unit is a one of a kind unit that is a flexible system that can be used for a broad range of applications due to its unique high temperature fuel cell stack, adaptable power electronics, and logistic fuel processor.  GEI's Smart Fuel Cell is the ultimate solution for the following applications.

Commercial Trucking

Commercial trucking APU power needs are increasing as better amenities are being added to sleeper cabins by the truck manufacturers to provide comfortable and sometimes luxurious interiors. Current APU power needs are approximately 2 to 6 kWe and are projected to go higher. Meeting this power demand through truck idling results in a significant cost estimated to be $5,700/truck/year with significant environmental emissions. Argonne National Laboratory estimates that 480,000 class 8 trucks alone generate 120 million pounds of NO, 202 million pounds of CO, and 9.6 million tons of CO2 annually; they also generate about 5.5 million pounds of particulate matter.

Current APU technologies to replace truck idling are based on diesel engine power generators, which, though better than truck idling, still possess a range of problems, including low efficiency and high noise and emissions.

We believe that fuel cell (FC)-based APU technologies are ideally suited for use in truck APUs because of their inherent benefits.

Telecommunications

Today’s telecommunications networks demand backup power solutions that provide highly reliable, cost-effective power for extended periods of time. As such the availability and reliability of backup power sources are a major concern not only in the United States, but also globally. With over 220,000 cell sites nationally and increasing cell and internet traffic, weather conditions and a fragile power infrastructure have caused blackouts across the country, and making customers and service providers look for backup power solutions that offer durability and flexibility at a reasonable cost. More recently, the realization that our power generation and distribution system may be vulnerable to interruptions due to terrorist and natural disasters has increased this need significantly. Why Traditional Solutions Won't Work  power use may not translate directly, or even easily, into stationary applications. Even on the automotive front, several key issues remain to be resolved, among them load response and the need for intelligent systems to charge and maintain the batteries. One other disadvantage may prove troublesome for wireless networks as well: lithium's high flammability. The risk of fire only adds to liability concerns and replacement costs. eight hours or less of backup power time, lower power needs, and where convenient access to hydrogen refueling is available. Six bottles of hydrogen provide eight hours of backup power for a 5 kW load. However, in situations requiring extended backup power times, higher power needs or in situations where hydrogen delivery is difficult or impossible, compressed hydrogen is a challenge. For example, 36 hydrogen cylinders are required to provide 48 hours of backup power for a 5 kW load. are required. In situations where hydrogen storage is difficult due to space and weight restrictions, liquid fuel combined with a fuel reformer is the most economical solution. Additionally, at remote installation locations such as telecommunications tower sites, hydrogen can prove to be difficult, bulky and heavy to store, and maintenance to re-supply industrial hydrogen cylinders in these remotes sites is not feasible. Reforming technologies and fuel cell products that incorporate reformers exist today that eliminate these obstacles and pave the way for even broader network applications.  According to a national U.S. survey commissioned by Emerson4, power outages resulting in downtime are common.

Military

The U.S. Army is transforming itself into a globally deployable force. The new force will need to operate with a smaller, more deployable logistics support system. Because much of the present logistics support systems exist to move fuel, improved battlefield fuel economy will help reduce logistics support requirements. These forces need new lightweight, fuel-efficient, air transportable equipment, with light, efficient logistics support systems.

 To offset the obvious reductions in armor and heavy weapons in this new force, new vehicles are being developed as part of the Future Combat Systems (FCS). The FCS is not a single vehicle or vehicle family, but rather a system of systems designed to use lighter weapons and faster vehicles more effectively to achieve the results of heavier forces. Two of the keys to this increased effectiveness are reducing the forces’ dependence on a heavy logistics support system and the development of an integrated battlefield data-sharing environment for U.S. forces, called “battlefield digitization.”

 Battlefield digitization has created new vehicle electric power demands. To be effective, digitization equipment must operate essentially all the time. A digitization suite includes items such as computers, digital radios, encryption systems, displays, identification friend-or-foe (IFF) and Global Positioning System (GPS) devices, with a combined power demand typically around one-kilowatt (kW), or 36 amps (A) on a military vehicle 28-volt system. This demand, when added to the power needed for personnel heaters, battery charging, sighting and detection equipment, often exceeds vehicle alternator capacities. The situation is made worse by the need for long waiting, or “silent watch” periods, during military operations in which a vehicle crew must minimize noise, thermal and other emissions for scouting or ambush. This effectively rules out running an engine.